Arizona sues Google over claims it illegally tracked location of Android users

Arizona sues Google over claims it illegally tracked location of Android users

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich has filed a lawsuit against Google over allegations the company illegally tracked Android users’ location without their consent and even when the location tracking features had been manually disabled, according to a report from The Washington Post.

Google Is Helping Governments Create Mass Coronavirus Surveillance

Google Is Helping Governments Create Mass Coronavirus Surveillance

Palantir and others are providing the government help locating people through their phones, as well as facial-recognition tech that can assist in finding people who contacted individuals who later tested positive for coronavirus, TheWSJ noted, citing sources familiar with the matter.Tech experts warn about collecting geolocation data, according to a report Monday from The Washington Post.

These maps use phone data to track social distancing - The Washington…

These maps use phone data to track social distancing - The Washington…

The Washington Post reported last week that the U.S. government is in talks with Facebook, Google and other tech companies about using anonymous location data to combat the coronavirus, including tracking whether people are keeping at safe distances from one another.

Federal government in talks with tech groups to use phone location data to track coronavirus: report

Federal government in talks with tech groups to use phone location data to track coronavirus: report

The federal government is in talks with Facebook, Google and other tech companies about ways to use smartphone location data to tackle the coronavirus, The Washington Post reported Tuesday.

U.S. Government Exploring Ways to Use Smartphone Location Data to Track Coronavirus Spread

U.S. Government Exploring Ways to Use Smartphone Location Data to Track Coronavirus Spread

The United States government is in talks with Facebook, Google, and other tech companies about how location data from smartphones can be used to combat the coronavirus, reports The Washington Post.

Whisper app exposes intimate secrets of nearly a billion users

Whisper app exposes intimate secrets of nearly a billion users

An investigation by The Washington Post, however, has revealed that Whisper left the information of nearly 900 million users exposed to anyone that wanted to view it, located in a database that wasn’t password protected and was accessible by the public.

CIA controlled global encryption company for decades, says report

CIA controlled global encryption company for decades, says report

Encryption weaknesses added to products sold by Crypto AG allowed the CIA and its German counterpart, the BND, to eavesdrop on adversaries and allies alike while earning million of dollars from the sales, according the Washington Post and the German public broadcaster ZDF, based on the agencies’ internal histories of the intelligence operation.

Uber will start audio-recording rides as a safety measure

Uber will start audio-recording rides as a safety measure

Uber will launch a feature to audio-record rides in the United States as a way to ensure passenger and driver safety, according to company communications accessed by The Washington Post and confirmed by Uber itself.

Colleges and universities are tracking potential applicants when they visit their websites, including how much time they spend on financial aid pages

Colleges and universities are tracking potential applicants when they visit their websites, including how much time they spend on financial aid pages

At least 44 US colleges and universities have hired private consulting firms to help them track applicants who visit their websites, Douglas MacMillan and Nick Anderson at The Washington Post recently reported.

FTC reaches reported settlement with Google over YouTube child privacy violations

FTC reaches reported settlement with Google over YouTube child privacy violations

The settlement concludes that Google did not adequately shield children who were using the platform and collected their data in violation of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), The Washington Post reports, citing two sources.

Google reportedly fined over children's privacy on YouTube

Google reportedly fined over children's privacy on YouTube

The settlement comes after an FTC investigation over whether the tech giant sufficiently protected the data of children using the platform, according to a Friday report from The Washington Post citing two people familiar with the matter.

DEA tracked every opioid pill sold in the US. The data is out—and it’s horrific

DEA tracked every opioid pill sold in the US. The data is out—and it’s horrific

While the local governments suing the companies have had access to this data during the litigation, it was only released to the public after the Washington Post and HD Media, publisher of the Charleston Gazette-Mail of West Virginia, sued and waged a year-long legal battle.

Review: Google Chrome has become surveillance software. It’s time to switch.

Review: Google Chrome has become surveillance software. It’s time to switch.

Google’s product managers told me in an interview that Chrome prioritizes privacy choices and controls, and they’re working on new ones for cookies. The Washington Post website has about 40 tracker cookies, average for a news site, which the company said in a statement are used to deliver better-targeted ads and track ad performance.

YouTube facing investigation from federal government over inability to protect children

YouTube facing investigation from federal government over inability to protect children

YouTube’s ongoing problems surrounding content that involves children has led to an investigation from the federal government, according to a new Washington Post report.

The New Wilderness (Idle Words)

The New Wilderness (Idle Words)

Writing in a similar vein in the Washington Post this March, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg called for Congress to pass privacy laws modeled on the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

A US police force is running suspect sketches through Amazon's facial recognition tech and it could lead to wrongful arrests

A US police force is running suspect sketches through Amazon's facial recognition tech and it could lead to wrongful arrests

Police in Washington County are running sketches of suspects through Amazon's facial recognition software, The Washington Post reports. AI experts told the Post that using a sketch could increase the likelihood of a false match, a sentiment which was echoed by Privacy International's Frederike Kaltheuner when contacted by Business Insider.

Virginia Court Throws Out License Plate Readers Data Collection

Virginia Court Throws Out License Plate Readers Data Collection

Smith is a victory for privacy rights advocates who argued that the police could track a person’s movements by compiling the times and exact locations of a car anytime its plate was captured by a license plate reader,” writes Tom Jackman in the Washington Post.

Facebook fights to “shield Zuckerberg” from punishment in US privacy probe

Facebook fights to “shield Zuckerberg” from punishment in US privacy probe

with 35 posters participating Federal Trade Commission officials are discussing whether to hold Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg personally accountable for Facebook's privacy failures, according to reports by The Washington Post and NBC News.

Federal investigators could hold Mark Zuckerberg personally responsible for any Facebook privacy failings, according to new report

Federal investigators could hold Mark Zuckerberg personally responsible for any Facebook privacy failings, according to new report

A federal investigation into Facebook could find Mark Zuckerberg directly responsible for any privacy failings on the social network, according to a new report in the Washington Post.

Antitrust case against Google similar to Microsoft's: Mississippi AG

Antitrust case against Google similar to Microsoft's: Mississippi AG

"We attorneys general have authority under consumer protection acts to do both," Hood said on "The Exchange." "So it'll be a multifaceted suit or, hopefully, we can get a settlement if we can get some agreement with them." Several state attorneys generals recently spoke about their willingness to go after the likes of , Google and other tech giants in interviews with The Washington Post .

After the quantified self, the quantified employee; but what about privacy?

After the quantified self, the quantified employee; but what about privacy?

But technology has moved on in the intervening time, and there are now other ways to keep an eye on employees , as an article in the Washington Post describes: Devices worn on employees’ bodies are an increasingly valuable source of workforce health intelligence for employers and insurance companies.

Apple Gives Deep State Access To Roger Stone's iCloud Account, After Refusing To Violate Privacy of San Bernardino Terrorists

Apple Gives Deep State Access To Roger Stone's iCloud Account, After Refusing To Violate Privacy of San Bernardino Terrorists

More from the Washington Post on Apple’s refusal to turn over access to the San Bernandino shooters devices… “If allowed to stand, the order in Apple’s case would have forced company engineers to create software to disable a phone security feature so that the FBI could try its hand at unlocking the device by cracking a numeric password.

Google chief trusts AI makers to regulate the technology

Google chief trusts AI makers to regulate the technology

Tech companies building AI should factor in ethics early in the process to make certain artificial intelligence with "agency of its own" doesn't hurt people, Pichai said in an interview with the Washington Post.

Washington Post offers invalid cookie consent under EU rules – ICO

Washington Post offers invalid cookie consent under EU rules – ICO

The Washington Post newspaper's online subscription options don't comply with European Union data protection rules – but the UK's privacy watchdog can only issue it with a firm telling off.