Australia proposed using facial recognition technology for online gambling and pornography age verification

Australia proposed using facial recognition technology for online gambling and pornography age verification

The Australian government’s Department of Home Affairs has proposed using facial recognition for online age verification for pornography and gambling websites visited by Australians as an update to Australia’s National Identity Security Strategy.

Australia's regulator to take Google to court over data privacy

Australia's regulator to take Google to court over data privacy

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) filed a lawsuit against the local unit of Alphabet Inc's Google on Tuesday, alleging that the company misled smartphone users on how it collected, kept and used personal location data.

More than half a million metadata disclosures handed to enforcement agencies: ACMA

More than half a million metadata disclosures handed to enforcement agencies: ACMA

Over 508,000 disclosures of metadata to law enforcement agencies for criminal law purposes under the controversial Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 (TIA Act) occurred during the 2018-19 fiscal year, an increase from last year's 482,800, the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) 2018-19 annual report [PDF] has revealed.

Attorney General Bill Barr Will Ask Zuckerberg To Halt Plans For End-To-End Encryption Across Facebook's Apps

Attorney General Bill Barr Will Ask Zuckerberg To Halt Plans For End-To-End Encryption Across Facebook's Apps

Signed by Barr, UK Home Secretary Priti Patel, acting US Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan, and Australian Minister for Home Affairs Peter Dutton, the letter raises concerns that Facebook’s plan to build end-to-end encryption into its messaging apps will prevent law enforcement agencies from finding illegal activity conducted through Facebook, including child sexual exploitation, terrorism, and election meddling.

Home Affairs pushes for cyber spy powers

Home Affairs pushes for cyber spy powers

The Department of Home Affairs is pushing ahead with moves to expand the powers of Australia’s cyber spy agency, the Australian Signals Directorate, to potentially embed ASD within the corporate computer systems that run the nation’s banks, telecommunications and other critical infrastructure.

Facebook Embeds 'Hidden Codes' To Track Who Sees And Shares Your Photos, Report

Facebook Embeds 'Hidden Codes' To Track Who Sees And Shares Your Photos, Report

Now in the same week that details of the record $5 billion FTC fine emerged, an Australian cyber researcher has reopened a years-old debate as to whether the social media giant is embedding "hidden codes" in photos uploaded by users onto the site.

Australia's anti-encryption laws being used to bypass journalist protections, expert says

Australia's anti-encryption laws being used to bypass journalist protections, expert says

“In June 2019, the Australian federal police executed two search warrants in relation to secrecy offences in part 6 (offences by and against public officers) and part 7 (official secrets and unlawful soundings) of the Crimes Act,” the Department of Home Affairs stated.

Federal police raid home of News Corp journalist Annika Smethurst

Federal police raid home of News Corp journalist Annika Smethurst

The Australian federal police have raided the home of News Corp Australia journalist Annika Smethurst investigating the publication of a leaked plan to allow government spying on Australians.

Facebook lobbied against Australian privacy regulations, flying in the face of Mark Zuckerberg's PR push

Facebook lobbied against Australian privacy regulations, flying in the face of Mark Zuckerberg's PR push

The documents, which are marked “highly confidential” and have been seen by Business Insider Australia, also suggest Bleich was critical of the Australian government and offered to amplify Facebook’s concerns with relevant policymakers.

An Australian worker won a landmark privacy case against his employer after he was fired for refusing to use a fingerprint scanner

An Australian worker won a landmark privacy case against his employer after he was fired for refusing to use a fingerprint scanner

According to case documents, Lee asserted that he had ownership over the biometric data contained within his fingerprint, and that Superior Wood could not require that information from him under the country's Privacy Act. Lee filed a suit with Australia's Fair Work Commission in March 2018, claiming he was unfairly dismissed from the company.

China’s Big Brother Social Control Goes to Australia

China’s Big Brother Social Control Goes to Australia

Just as in China, the surveillance system is being branded as a “smart city” program, and while Australian officials claim its operations are benign, they’ve announced it functions to monitor cell phone activity and “virtual fences” that will trigger alerts if people cross them.

Political parties combine social media data with electoral roll information

Political parties combine social media data with electoral roll information

Australian political parties are using voter email addresses to find matching social media profiles then combining them with the country's compulsory electoral roll data, illustrating how privacy scandals have done little to slow the march of data-driven campaigning.

How the Australian election has invaded your inbox with email tracking tools

How the Australian election has invaded your inbox with email tracking tools

The ABC found various pixels in campaign emails sent by the Australian Greens, the Labor and the Liberal Party, as well as from lobby groups Advance Australia and GetUp. Open tracking is a standard technique used by marketers, as well as by newsletter services deployed by media organisations, including the ABC, but its use in electioneering has privacy experts concerned.

Australian Child-Tracking Smartwatch Vulnerable to Hackers

Australian Child-Tracking Smartwatch Vulnerable to Hackers

(Photo: Troy Hunt) An Australian company that markets a smartwatch that lets parents monitor their children shut down its service on Monday after researchers revealed hackers could track a child's location, spoof the location, add themselves as a "parent" and view personally identifiable information associated with the account.

Loki registers as the first Australian not-for-profit privacy firm

Loki registers as the first Australian not-for-profit privacy firm

The Loki Foundation will also use blockchain to support a developer community that will build a suite of software and online applications that enhance digital privacy.

Microsoft: Companies "no longer comfortable" storing data in Australia after controversial encryption law

Microsoft: Companies "no longer comfortable" storing data in Australia after controversial encryption law

Others in the business of technology have been less polite - co-founder of Australian enterprise software company Atlassian, Scott Farquhar, said at the Safe Encryption Australian forum: “The law has created uncertainty for our staff and our customers, it places the tech industry in a chokehold.".

Australia threatens social media laws that could jail tech executives

Australia threatens social media laws that could jail tech executives

Following the livestreamed New Zealand mosque shooting that left 50 dead in Christchurch, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is looking to crack down on extremist content on social media.

Uber used secret spyware to try to crush Australian start-up GoCatch

Uber used secret spyware to try to crush Australian start-up GoCatch

Uber developed spyware code-named Surfcam in its Sydney office in 2015Surfcam scraped data on competitors' cars to allow Uber to poach driversUber used Surfcam to steal drivers from start-up GoCatch The spyware program, code-named Surfcam, was deployed against Australian start-up rideshare company GoCatch, which was backed by high-profile investors including billionaire James Packer and hedge fund manager Alex Turnbull.

Law enforcement needs to protect citizens and their data

Law enforcement needs to protect citizens and their data

While the bill includes limited restrictions on law enforcement requests, the vague definitions and concentrated authorities give the Australian government sweeping powers that ultimately undermine the security and privacy of the very citizens they aim to protect.

The Government wants to free up your bank data. Here's what that means for you

The Government wants to free up your bank data. Here's what that means for you

The Consumer Data Right (CDR), which begins to come online mid-year, aims to give Australians more agency to access and control parts of their personal information.

LOKI: Can the “Trickster” Crypto Help Restore Democratic Order to the Internet?

LOKI: Can the “Trickster” Crypto Help Restore Democratic Order to the Internet?

LOKI If you are new to LOKI, the Australian project is self described on their landing page as a “privacy network which will allow users to transact and communicate privately over the internet, providing a suite of tools to help maintain the maximum amount of anonymity possible while browsing, transacting and communicating online”.

How Australia Will Handle Cryptocurrency Hacks After Coincheck

How Australia Will Handle Cryptocurrency Hacks After Coincheck

What the Coincheck hack tells us about how Australian regulators will handle a cryptocurrency hack Hacks like the one on Coincheck expose gullible investors to risk, but it also means funds could be flowing undetected into the hands of money launderers and terrorists.

Google creates ‘shadow profiles’ on Android users, Oracle says

Google creates ‘shadow profiles’ on Android users, Oracle says

Oracle levelled the claims in a document provided to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s digital platforms inquiry the regulator made public on Tuesday along with 26 other submissions including News Corp Australia’s, urging the ACCC to recommend to the Government that Google be split up.

Moving our privacy advocacy forward to protect Australia and you

Moving our privacy advocacy forward to protect Australia and you

In our submission, we cited possible impacts of the act on the local technology sector including creating a distrust of Australia and Australian companies, causing financial losses to tech business, and creating confusion and stress among technical talent.

End-to-end encryption ‘infects’ law enforcement, says FBI, as Apple and others seek to protect it

End-to-end encryption ‘infects’ law enforcement, says FBI, as Apple and others seek to protect it

The remark was made as Apple and other tech companies warn of the danger of compromising strong encryption after the Australian government passed a law which would require them to help access encrypted messages on demand … NordVPN The WSJ quotes FBI executive assistant director Amy Hess.

Apple, Google, Facebook Among Tech Giants Fighting Privacy Battle

Apple, Google, Facebook Among Tech Giants Fighting Privacy Battle

Last week, a consortium of tech companies led by Apple, Google, and issued a letter to the Australian government asking it to rethink a law passed in December that would make it easier for law enforcement to compel those companies to furnish user data.

Tech giants and civil liberty groups call out ghost cops and source code demands under Australian encryption laws

Tech giants and civil liberty groups call out ghost cops and source code demands under Australian encryption laws

A collective of companies and civil liberty groups including Apple, Amazon, Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Privacy International, Linux Australia, and the Electronics Frontier Foundation have issued a warning that requirements to silently add law enforcement into encryption chats could introduce vulnerabilities and create new risks to systems.

More than 800 data breaches reported to Australian privacy watchdog in 2018

More than 800 data breaches reported to Australian privacy watchdog in 2018

Data from the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) reveals that last year it received 812 notifications as part of the mandatory breach reporting regime. Tags privacy cyber security data breaches Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC)

Australian Government Agencies Already Flexing Their New Encryption-Breaking Powers

Australian Government Agencies Already Flexing Their New Encryption-Breaking Powers

If accessing a single target's communications can only be done by introducing a systemic vulnerability, it's safe to say the government will find a way to make the requested assistance adhere to the definitions its provided -- anything to avoid having to use the phrase "backdoor" anywhere in reports or public statements.

Australian Assistance and Access Bill 2018

Australian Assistance and Access Bill 2018

Blanket Weakening of Encryption IS NOT the way to replace Due Diligence If you don’t know by now, in December 2018 the Australian government with the support of the Australian Labor party passed new legislation that requires technology companies to be able to decrypt and hand over user data, when requested by law enforcement and the public services.

More