Amazon Secret Sauce(s) — Why Your Privacy Does Not Matter Anymore

Amazon Secret Sauce(s) — Why Your Privacy Does Not Matter Anymore

AWS is a cloud-computing service where companies can create scalable big data applications and secure them without the need for expensive and complex hardware infrastructure.

Could Your Ad Tracking Put You Out of Business?

Could Your Ad Tracking Put You Out of Business?

A business that uses tracking is tracked and just as much data is grabbed about the company trying to drum up more business than gets snagged in the drag net of online consumer information.

Hunting with ꓘamerka 2.0 aka FIST (Flickr, Instagram, Shodan, Twitter)

Hunting with ꓘamerka 2.0 aka FIST (Flickr, Instagram, Shodan, Twitter)

ꓘamerka has new cool features, right now you can search for Flickr and Instagram photos, printers and cameras from Shodan and Tweets (FIST). root@kali:~/# python kamerka.py — lat xx,x — lon yy,y — instagram Photo from Instagram near “secret” Amazon warehouse

'Alexa, who did it?' What happens when a judge in a murder trial wants data from a smart home speaker

'Alexa, who did it?' What happens when a judge in a murder trial wants data from a smart home speaker

"I think this is the beginning of the 'internet of evidence' where lots of pieces of smart devices are going to show up in criminal prosecutions," Andrew Guthrie Ferguson, author of The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement, told Day 6.

People Who Buy Smart Speakers Have Given Up on Privacy, Researchers Find

People Who Buy Smart Speakers Have Given Up on Privacy, Researchers Find

A recent study from researchers at the University of Michigan found that people who own smart speakers are aware of the risks, but feel resigned to the idea that the erosion of privacy is now a fact of life.

Amazon admits it exposed customer email addresses, but refuses to give details

Amazon admits it exposed customer email addresses, but refuses to give details

In response to a request for specifics, a spokesperson said the company had “nothing to add beyond our statement.” The company denies there was a data breach of its website of any of its systems, and says it’s fixed the issue, but dismissed our request for more info including the cause, scale and circumstances of the error.

Amazon discloses names and addresses -- but doesn't disclose details

Amazon discloses names and addresses -- but doesn't disclose details

If you're an Amazon customer you may have received a rather strange email this morning. Meantime if you've received one of these emails let us know in the comments below.

Ready to be tracked at the grocery store? Amazon’s mini-mart raises new questions for digital privacy

Ready to be tracked at the grocery store? Amazon’s mini-mart raises new questions for digital privacy

This diagram appears in a pair of related patents by Amazon executives, which describe a variety of high-tech methods of tracking products, employees and customers through a facility such as a distribution center or a retail store.

Here’s What the Big Tech Companies Know About You

Here’s What the Big Tech Companies Know About You

Today’s infographic comes to us from Security Baron, and it compares and contrasts the data that big tech companies admit to collecting in their privacy policies. Remember, this is just what companies admit to collecting in their privacy policies – what else do you think they know?

Amazon's 1st high-tech grocery store opens to the public

Amazon's 1st high-tech grocery store opens to the public

Amazon.com Inc will open its checkout-free grocery store to the public on Monday after more than a year of testing, the company said, moving forward on an experiment that could dramatically alter brick-and-mortar retail. "This technology didn't exist," Puerini said, walking through the Seattle store.

AmazonBasics Microwave review: Alexa makes you popcorn, orders more in this compact, affordable microwave

AmazonBasics Microwave review: Alexa makes you popcorn, orders more in this compact, affordable microwave

For $60, you can buy this AmazonBasics Microwave and find out what it's like to say, "Alexa, microwave 3 ounces of popcorn." Spoiler: It feels pretty natural. Saying "Alexa, microwave for 2 minutes," or "Alexa, stop cooking" feels like the way we should have been using microwaves all along.

Google, Facebook, and Amazon benefit from an outdated definition of “monopoly”

Google, Facebook, and Amazon benefit from an outdated definition of “monopoly”

For decades the standard for evaluating whether to break up monopolies, or block the mergers that create them, has been “consumer welfare.” And this consumer welfare standard has predominantly been interpreted as low prices.

Will you be getting a smart home spy for Christmas?

Will you be getting a smart home spy for Christmas?

You can still speak to the digital assistants embedded in these devices, but their screens enable hands-free video calling (apart from the Google one), can act as a control pad for various smart devices you may have around your home, such as thermostats or security cameras and (this feature is on heavy rotation in all the promotional material) you can use them to prompt you through a recipe without resorting to smearing your buttery fingers over your phone or laptop.

Facebook Is the Least Trusted Major Tech Company When it Comes to Safeguarding Personal Data, Poll Finds

Facebook Is the Least Trusted Major Tech Company When it Comes to Safeguarding Personal Data, Poll Finds

is the least trustworthy of all major tech companies when it comes to safeguarding user data, according to a new national poll conducted for Fortune, highlighting the major challenges the company faces following a series of recent privacy blunders.

NH judge orders Amazon to give Echo recordings in murder case

NH judge orders Amazon to give Echo recordings in murder case

A judge has ordered Amazon to turn over recordings that might have been captured by an Echo smart speaker in the Farmington house where two women were stabbed to death in January 2017.

Orlando Testing Facial Recognition Technology Provided Free by Amazon

Orlando Testing Facial Recognition Technology Provided Free by Amazon

Amazon marketed its facial recognition tools to Orlando’s police department, providing tens of thousands of dollars of technology to the city at no cost, and shielding the Rekognition pilot with a mutual nondisclosure agreement that kept its details out of the public eye.

Microsoft, Amazon Top BEC's Favorite Brands

Microsoft, Amazon Top BEC's Favorite Brands

Nearly two-thirds of email attacks spoofing brand names impersonate Microsoft or Amazon, according to one of two studies released today on advanced emailed threats.

Australian bill spells trouble for data privacy around the world

Australian bill spells trouble for data privacy around the world

An unlikely alliance of tech companies, start-ups and digital consumer rights groups has locked horns with the Australian government over its proposed anti-data encryption law, currently under review by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS).

Documents shed light on how Amazon is shaping public discourse about Rekognition

Documents shed light on how Amazon is shaping public discourse about Rekognition

The official statement read in part: “the City of Orlando will continue to test Amazon Rekognition facial recognition software to determine if this technology could reliably identify specific individuals as they come within view of specific cameras.” The documents obtained by Buzzfeed provide a look behind the curtain at communications between the company and the police department, as Orlando’s test pilot was thrust into the national spotlight.

Walmart-owned Sam’s Club is opening a cashier-less store in Texas

Walmart-owned Sam’s Club is opening a cashier-less store in Texas

Sam’s Club — the members-only, Walmart-owned retail store — is taking a page from Amazon’s playbook by opening an experimental cashier-less “Sam’s Club Now” store in Texas.

With No Laws To Guide It, Here's How Orlando Is Using Amazon's Facial Recognition Technology

With No Laws To Guide It, Here's How Orlando Is Using Amazon's Facial Recognition Technology

The documents, obtained by BuzzFeed News via a Freedom of Information request, show that Amazon marketed its facial recognition tools to Orlando’s police department, providing tens of thousands of dollars of technology to the city at no cost, and shielding the Rekognition pilot with a mutual nondisclosure agreement that kept its details out of the public eye.

An ISP Left Corporate Passwords, Keys, and All its Data Exposed on the Internet

An ISP Left Corporate Passwords, Keys, and All its Data Exposed on the Internet

According to a new report by the security researchers at UpGuard, a Washington-based ISP by the name of Pocket iNet left 73 gigabytes of essential operational data publicly exposed in a misconfigured Amazon S3 storage bucket for months.

I’m an Amazon Employee. My Company Shouldn’t Sell Facial Recognition Tech to Police.

I’m an Amazon Employee. My Company Shouldn’t Sell Facial Recognition Tech to Police.

Amazon, where I work, is currently allowing police departments around the country to purchase its facial recognition product, Rekognition, and I and other employees demand that we stop immediately.

Amazon worker pushes Bezos to stop selling facial recognition tech to law enforcement

Amazon worker pushes Bezos to stop selling facial recognition tech to law enforcement

A group of over 400 employees signed a letter in June urging Amazon to stop selling its facial recognition software to law enforcement and working with Palantir, which provides digital services to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Amazon hopes to blanket your home and car with listening, eavesdropping Alexa devices

Amazon hopes to blanket your home and car with listening, eavesdropping Alexa devices

It’s an example of how manufacturers can build voice-controlled devices using the Alexa Connect Kit, “without worrying about managing cloud services, writing an Alexa skill, or developing complex networking and security firmware,” as Amazon says.

Amazon patents new Alexa feature that knows when you're ill and offers you medicine

Amazon patents new Alexa feature that knows when you're ill and offers you medicine

Amazon has patented a new version of its virtual assistant Alexa which can automatically detect when you’re ill and offer to sell you medicine. Alexa first suggests some chicken soup to cure her cold, and then offers to order cough drops on Amazon.

A Future Where Everything Becomes a Computer Is as Creepy as You Feared

A Future Where Everything Becomes a Computer Is as Creepy as You Feared

At a press event last month, an Amazon engineer showed how easily a maker of household fans could create a “smart” fan using Amazon’s chip, known as the Alexa Connect Kit. The kit, which Amazon is testing with some manufacturers, would simply be plugged into the fan’s control unit during assembly.

Amazon staff said to be taking bribes to leak data

Amazon staff said to be taking bribes to leak data

The Wall Street Journal reports that Amazon employees have been bribed to leak corporate data - such as sales metrics and the personal details of reviewers - to sellers:

Which? says that high-profile apps hide their data-collection practises - despite GDPR

Which? says that high-profile apps hide their data-collection practises - despite GDPR

Some phone apps use sneaky tactics to get users to share more information than they intend, according to a new report by Which? highlights the lengthy word counts apps use in their terms and conditions.

Amazon’s blockbuster Alexa event made zero mention of privacy concerns — and that may say more about us than about them

Amazon’s blockbuster Alexa event made zero mention of privacy concerns — and that may say more about us than about them

And maybe, just maybe, that’s because most consumers have given up on the idea of privacy in our times — or believe that the risk-reward balance of technologies like Alexa tilt in the direction of our new artificially intelligent overlords.

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